33 posts categorized "Conferences"

01/19/2017

UPDATED Call for papers: ASE/ASSA 2018 meetings, "Democratic Crisis and the Responsibility of Economics"

ASSOCIATION FOR SOCIAL ECONOMICS

CALL FOR PAPERS

Allied Social Science Association Annual Meeting
Philadelphia, PA: January 5-7 (Friday to Sunday), 2018 

THEME: “Democratic Crisis and the Responsibility of Economics”

SUBMISSIONS NOW BEING ACCEPTED

Recent eruptions of populist reaction and aggressive nationalism in Europe, the US, and beyond have unsettled economists and other social scientists on the left, right, and in the political center. Many now worry about the continued viability of democratic ideals in what they view as a moment of “unreason,” and about their role in unfolding events. Not least, both the Brexit vote and the subsequent election of President Trump can be read in part as rejections of the authority and privileges of experts who advise democratic governments in pursuit of economic wellbeing and other valued goals. For the ASE sessions at the 2017 ASSA meetings, we welcome proposals for papers/sessions on all aspects of social economics, but preference will be given to papers related to the contemporary democratic crisis, and the responsibility of the economics profession—both its culpability (if any) in the crisis, and its obligations and duties in the new political conjuncture. Possible questions include but are not limited to:

-- What are the connections between predominant economic prescriptions and economists’ practice over the past two decades or so and unfolding political events? In what ways did the profession contribute to economic and political conditions under which political reaction and nationalism could flourish? Is inequality or “globalization” partly to blame, for instance, and if so, to what degree is the economics profession at fault for long emphasizing “efficiency” and growth over equitable distribution of income, wealth, or capabilities? 

-- What lessons for the economics profession are there in the new movements? What do they tell us about the centrality of political and economic inclusion/exclusion for the viability of the democratic ideals of mutual regard, tolerance, equality, and civic duties?

-- How should social and other economists respond to the rejection of expertise that marks these new political movements? To what degree and how should the economics profession evolve in light of these events—in the ends to which economists commit themselves, the means they employ to achieve good economic outcomes, and their positioning (as detached experts) vis-à-vis the communities they purport to serve?

-- To what degree does the new populism represent the renewed salience of “class” alongside or as opposed to “identity” politics? How might the return to class in politics affect ongoing campaigns for the rights and interests of racial and ethnic minorities, women, LGBTQ communities, and other groups that are demanding equal economic, political, and social opportunities? In short, does the return to class represent new opportunities, or new perils?

-- What opportunities arise in the current conjuncture for economists to press the case for economic justice, genuine respect and equality, tolerance, and other valued goods? Or is opposition to entrenchment the best that can be hoped for?

Proposals for papers as well as complete sessions are welcome.

The submission deadline is May 1, 2017.  The online form can be found here.

Individuals whose papers are accepted for presentation must either be or become members of the Association for Social Economics by July 1, 2017 in order for the paper to be included in the program.  Membership information can be found at www.socialeconomics.org. All papers presented at the ASSA meetings are eligible for the Warren Samuels Prize, awarded to the best paper that advances the goals of social economics and has widespread appeal. Papers can also be considered for a special issue of one of the association’s journals, or for edited volumes.

NB: Due to limited session slots, we cannot accept all submissions. Any paper that cannot be incorporated into the ASE program will be automatically considered for the ASE portion of the ICAPE conference, which will be held at Drexel University in downtown Philadelphia the day before the ASSA meetings (January 4, 2018). Drexel is a short cab or subway ride from the conference hotels. See icape.org for details.

Please email George DeMartino at George.DeMartino@du.edu with any questions.

02/16/2016

Call for papers: 2017 ASE/ASSA sessions on "Human Development and Poverty Reduction"

UPDATE: The submission site is now open. The deadline is May 1.

From Quentin Wodon, ASE president-elect:

BasuThe Association for Social Economics (ASE) is one of the founding members of the Allied Social Sciences Associations that holds its annual meetings together with the American Economic Association (AEA) in January each year. In January 2017, the AEA-ASSA meetings will be held in Chicago. ASE will organize seven sessions, plus a Presidential breakfast during the conference and an opening plenary address the night before the start of the conference. The plenary will be given by Kaushik Basu, Senior Vice President for Development Economics at the World Bank.

We encourage you to submit proposals for individual papers or sessions. Apart from presenting your paper at the AEA-ASSA meetings, you will also have the opportunity to submit your paper (or a shortened, policy-oriented version thereof) for publication in a special issue of Forum for Social Economics devoted to some of the best papers presented in Chicago. In addition, papers presented at the ASSA meetings are eligible for the Warren Samuels Prize awarded to the best paper that advances the goals of social economics and has widespread appeal.

You may submit a paper or session proposal related to social economics broadly defined. We also encourage you to consider proposals for papers/sessions related to human development and poverty reduction, the theme of our ASE sessions this year. Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Poverty: How should poverty be measured? How should the impact on poverty of programs and policies be assessed? Is the nature of extreme poverty different from poverty? Which types of new and innovative programs appear especially promising to help reduce poverty and multiple forms of deprivation? To what extent is the persistence of extreme poverty an ethical issue? What does social justice have to say about the persistence of extreme poverty?
  • Education: How should education attainment and achievement be measured? How much progress has been achieved and what remains to be done to improve outcomes, especially for disadvantaged students? Which interventions should be prioritized to improve equity and inclusion in education? What have been the results of recent program and policy experiments in the area of education? What have we learned about specific vulnerable groups, such as children with disabilities, orphans, ethnic minorities, rural girls, etc.? What needs to be done in contexts of conflict and adversity?
  • Health and nutrition: What are the challenges faced by the poor to access health care? How can universal health care be promoted in developing countries? What are the consequences of catastrophic health events for the poor? Which types of interventions can help to improve health outcomes, especially for young children? What can be done to improve nutrition for children?
  • Social protection and labor: Do the poor benefit from social protection programs? What should be done about youth unemployment and underemployment? What are the results of recent experiments in these areas? Which social protection and employment programs appear to be most promising? How do threats such as climate change affect the resilience of communities?
  • Cross-cutting themes: How should we think about human development and poverty reduction in a cross-sectoral way? What can we learn from empirical research on cross-sectoral topics such as early childhood development or child marriage? What is the role of nonprofits, whether secular or faith-based, in improving human development outcomes, whether for education, health?

The submission deadline is May 1, 2016. Please go to the call for papers for ASSA on the ASE website for submissions at www.socialeconomics.org(The submission site is now open.) Individuals whose papers are accepted for presentation must either be or become members of the Association for Social Economics by July 1, 2016, in order for the paper to be included in the program. Although this is not required, you are encouraged to share your (draft) paper at the time of submission, as this will increase the likelihood of acceptance in the program and publication in the special issue of Forum for Social Economics.

02/01/2016

Call for Papers: IIPPE conference session on "Social Capital in Context: Crisis, Values and Power"

IIPPE’s Seventh International Conference in Political Economy
“Political Economy: International Trends and National Differences”
School of Economics & Management, University of Lisbon, Portugal
September 7-9, 2016
 
Call for Papers – Panel organised by Social Capital Working Group
 
Social Capital in Context: Crisis, Values and Power
 
Asimina Christoforou, Athens University of Economics and Business
Luca Andriani, Birkbeck, University of London
 
Economic models of social capital incorporate cooperative behaviour and trusting relations based on social norms and networks, challenging traditional assumptions of self-interest. Yet these models maintain instrumental, value-free, and individualist principles of rational choice, reducing cooperation, trust and solidarity to a means for satisfying individual preference and ensuring market efficiency. Thus they overlook the influence of the broader social and institutional context within which individuals and groups interact and which is characterized by diverse and conflictual interests, power and inequality, social and political struggles.
 
In this way, we fail to see that not all norms and networks are socially beneficial. For instance the current crises have fostered increasing poverty and inequality, the rise of extremist groups, the flux of immigrants and refugees, and the spread of uncertainty, fear and violence. There are groups in the private and public spheres that still promote policies that lead to market liberalization, welfare state retrenchment, the indebtedness of households and nations, the over-exploitation of the earth’s natural resources, and the degradation of certain ethnic and racial groups. At the same time, there are groups that resist these forces, raise social awareness and propose alternative values and networks for the restructuring of markets and states in order to protect the natural environment, human rights, justice and public welfare. These groups range from social movements spanning across countries to local organizations, especially in the social economy, mobilizing to respond to their community’s needs for subsistence and self-determination.
 
Thus we would like to invite contributions that re-contextualize conceptions and measures of social capital to incorporate the complex reality of social relations, as a dynamic space where people interact, define and pursue, individually and collectively, principles and objectives, means and ends for well-being. The aim is to uncover the dynamics of trust, cooperation and collective action to promote alternative principles and visions about the economy and society that favour public welfare. But we also encourage contributions that generally address the topic of social capital. We welcome works that derive from various social science disciplines and use different units of analysis (individual, regional, country or cross-country level), methodologies and techniques (theoretical, empirical, qualitative and quantitative).

Abstracts (500 words maximum) should be submitted by April 1, 2016. To submit your abstract, please go to the Electronic Proposal Form and carefully follow the instructions there. (All deadlines are listed at the link.)
 
For more general information about IIPPE, the working groups and the conference, please visit our websiteFor details on the panel, you can contact Asimina Christoforou (asimina.christoforou@gmail.com).

12/22/2015

Call for papers: IIPPE panel on "Social Capital in Context: Crisis, Values and Power"

IIPPE’s Seventh International Conference in Political Economy
“Political Economy: International Trends and National Differences”
School of Economics & Management, University of Lisbon, Portugal
September 7-9, 2016
 
Call for Papers – Panel organised by Social Capital Working Group
 
Social Capital in Context: Crisis, Values and Power
 
 
Asimina Christoforou, Athens University of Economics and Business
Luca Andriani, Birkbeck, University of London
 
Economic models of social capital incorporate cooperative behaviour and trusting relations based on social norms and networks, challenging traditional assumptions of self-interest. Yet these models maintain instrumental, value-free, and individualist principles of rational choice, reducing cooperation, trust and solidarity to a means for satisfying individual preference and ensuring market efficiency. Thus they overlook the influence of the broader social and institutional context within which individuals and groups interact and which is characterized by diverse and conflictual interests, power and inequality, social and political struggles.
 
In this way, we fail to see that not all norms and networks are socially beneficial. For instance the current crises have fostered increasing poverty and inequality, the rise of extremist groups, the flux of immigrants and refugees, and the spread of uncertainty, fear and violence. There are groups in the private and public spheres that still promote policies that lead to market liberalization, welfare state retrenchment, the indebtedness of households and nations, the over-exploitation of the earth’s natural resources, and the degradation of certain ethnic and racial groups. At the same time, there are groups that resist these forces, raise social awareness and propose alternative values and networks for the restructuring of markets and states in order to protect the natural environment, human rights, justice and public welfare. These groups range from social movements spanning across countries to local organizations, especially in the social economy, mobilizing to respond to their community’s needs for subsistence and self-determination.
 
Thus we would like to invite contributions that re-contextualize conceptions and measures of social capital to incorporate the complex reality of social relations, as a dynamic space where people interact, define and pursue, individually and collectively, principles and objectives, means and ends for well-being. The aim is to uncover the dynamics of trust, cooperation and collective action to promote alternative principles and visions about the economy and society that favour public welfare. But we also encourage contributions that generally address the topic of social capital. We welcome works that derive from various social science disciplines and use different units of analysis (individual, regional, country or cross-country level), methodologies and techniques (theoretical, empirical, qualitative and quantitative).

Abstracts (500 words maximum) should be submitted to Asimina Christoforou (asimina.christoforou@gmail.com) and Luca Andriani (luca.andriani@bbk.ac.uk) by April 1, 2016.
 
Also to submit your abstract, please go to the following Electronic Proposal Form, and carefully follow the complete instructions there. All deadline dates are included on this Electronic Proposal Form.
 
For more general information about IIPPE, the working groups and the conference, please visit our website

12/03/2015

Call for submissions: 2016 Warren Samuels Prize (Deadline: December 18, 2015)

The Association for Social Economics, one of the founding member organizations of the Allied Social Science Associations, together with the Review of Social Economy, would like to invite submissions for the 2016 Warren Samuels Prize.

This prize is awarded to a paper, presented at the January ASSA meetings, that best exemplifies scholarly work that:

  • Is of high quality,
  • Is important to the project of social economics,
  • Has broad appeal across disciplines.

It is preferable, but not required, that the paper is presented at one of the ASSA sessions sponsored by the Association for Social Economics. Papers will not normally exceed 6,500 words (inclusive of references, notes), and should follow the style guidelines for the Review of Social Economy.

The winner of the prize will be announced during the ASE presidential breakfast, to which the winner is invited. The winning paper may, subject to peer review, be published in a subsequent issue of the Review of Social Economy. The winner of the Warren Samuels Prize receives a $500 stipend.

The selection committee consists of:

The immediate Past-President of the ASE;
A Co-editor of the Review of Social Economy (Chair);
A member of the Editorial Board, Review of Social Economy.

This prize is awarded to a paper, being presented at the January 2016 ASSA meetings, in sessions not restricted to sessions in the ASE program.

Please send your paper electronically, as a word or pdf attachment, to ASE past-president Mark D. White (profmdwhite@hotmail.com) by December 18, 2015.

11/10/2015

Call for papers: ASE sessions at the Western Social Science Association Meetings

The 58th Annual WSSA conference will be held April 13-16, 2016, in Reno, NV, USA, at the Grand Sierra Resort. The Western Social Science Association invites proposals for both complete panels and individual papers. See below for more information regarding the conference.

The Association for Social Economics is in the process of developing a relationship with the Western Social Science Association and encourages proposals in all areas of social economics. 

 Section Theme: Social Economics

Please submit individual papers or complete panels concerning the study of the ethical and social causes and consequences of economic behavior, institutions, organizations, theory, and policy, and how these contribute to a sustainable, just, and efficient economy.  Of particular interest, are papers devoted to furthering the recent ASE dialogue regarding topics such as ethics, development, neoliberalism, social economic analyses of race, gender, class and ethnicity, social economic analysis of crises, inequality, the reform of economics, the origins of social economics, and linkages to other heterodox traditions.

ASE members will be registered for the "General Economics" section.

 
Deadline for proposals: November 24, 2015.

 
Please include the following information: (All information is to be submitted in Word format.)

Proposal Format: Paper         
Section & Name of Section Coordinator  (General Economics, ASE sessions, David Plante)
Title of the Paper    
Name and Affiliation  
Mailing Address, Telephone Number, E-mail   
Other Authors                  
Abstract (200 words; New Times Roman 12)

Proposal Format: Panel
Section & Name of Section Coordinator  (General Economics, ASE sessions, David Plante)
Title of the Panel
Title of Each Paper (3-4 papers)
Moderator (Affiliation, Mailing Address, Telephone Number, E-mail)
Presenters (Affiliation, Mailing Address, Telephone Number, E-mail)
Abstract for Each Paper (200 words; New Times Roman 12) 

Scholars willing to serve as moderators or discussants should indicate their interest to the appropriate section coordinator listed on the website.

All ASE submissions are to be sent to: David J. Plante (dplante@western.edu), Economics Department, Western State Colorado University

Current membership in ASE is required for presenting a paper.  Membership information can be found at www.socialeconomics.org. 

All presenters and moderators are required to register prior to March 1, 2016 at the WSSA web site http://wssa.asu.edu.

09/24/2015

Call for papers: ASE sessions at the Eastern Economic Association meetings

Submissions are now open for the Association for Social Economics sessions at the 2016 Eastern Economics Association meetings, being held in Washington D.C. from February 25 – 28, 2016. Please visit this link for more details on the conference itself.

Proposals for individual papers and organized sessions are welcome. Session themes that integrate economics and other social disciplines including philosophy, sociology, geography, political science, and anthropology are particularly encouraged.

Everyone whose proposals are accepted must register for the conference but do not have to pay the paper submission fee. It is expected that all presenters are willing to serve as a chair and/or discussant on other ASE sessions. Please indicate in your submission if there are any days or times that you are unavailable during the conference.

Please e-mail Michael J. Murray (mmurray@bemidjistate.edu) your proposals for papers and/or complete sessions (or any questions about the meetings) by Saturday, November 21, 2015.

09/22/2015

Call for papers: ASE sessions at the Midwest Economic Association meetings

Association for Social Economics

at the

Midwest Economics Association Annual Meeting

April 1-3, 2016

Hotel Hilton Orrington, Evanston/Chicago, IL

 

Theme: Human Development after the Economics of Growth

 

The most recent economic crisis calls into question the viability of growth-oriented economic policies.  In their place alternative strategies have emerged that broaden our understanding of what constitutes economic development oriented toward sustainability and human well-being.  Some of these responses focus their attention on the caring economy; human capabilities; democratic control over resource allocation, production and distribution; social enterprise; and community-based economic systems.  Many of these projects call for evaluation methods that are different from those used to measure economic growth.  They also point toward the need to restructure the standard economics curriculum. 

We invite papers from researchers and teachers that present case studies, empirical analyses, theoretical essays or pedagogical explorations that address these and other topics in social economics. 

Please submit a copy of the paper title and abstract (up to 250 words) to Bruce Pietrykowski, Association for Social Economics Midwest Regional Director: bpie@umich.edu no later than October 7, 2015.

Please refer to the Midwest Economic Association web site for further information regarding the 2016 MEA Conference: http://mea.grinnell.edu/conferences/conference-2015

09/15/2015

Association for Social Economics program at the 2016 ASSA meetings

Registration for ASSA opens at this link on Wednesday, September 16th, at 11 AM CST (12 noon EST). Be sure to register early to get a room in the Marriott Marquis (the hotel in which all ASE sessions and events will be held).

 

ASSOCIATION FOR SOCIAL ECONOMICS

Allied Social Science Association Annual Meeting

San Francisco, CA, January 3-5, 2016

 

Saturday, January 2, 2016, 6:30 pm, Marriott Marquis, Yerba Buena Salon 8:

Plenary Session and Reception: What We Learned from the Global Financial Crisis

Jan Kregel

(Levy Economics Institute of Bard College, USA; Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia; and University of Missouri-Kansas City, USA):
The Global Financial Crisis: What Have We Learned?

Giuseppe Fontana, Presiding
Univ. of Leeds, UK and Univ. of Sannio, Italy

Reception Immediately Following (Free Event)

 

Sunday, January 3, 8:00 am, Marriott Marquis, Pacific B
Job Guarantee: Issues in Social and Ecological Justice (J68, Q57)

Presiding: Michael Murray, Bemidji State University, mmurray@bemidjistate.edu

Public Works Program as a Strong Means for Land and Water Conservation in Iran
Zahra Karimi, University of Mazandaran, zakarimi@umz.ac.ir

Bioregional JG: The Creation of a New Social Ethos
Josefina Y. Li, University of Minnesota Duluth, jyli@umd.edu

Complementary Currencies, Communities, Cooperation: The Local Job Guarantee for Sustainable Prosperity
Mathew Forstater, University of Missouri-Kansas City, forstaterm@umkc.edu

Getting Serious about the Limits to Growth: ELR and Economic Restructuring under Decroissance
Hendrik Van den Berg, University of Nebraska – Lincoln, hvan_den_berg1@unl.edu

Redefining Efficiency in Agriculture: Theoretical Contributions from Ecological Economics and Agroecology
Michael Wironen, Gund Institute for Ecological Economics, Univ. of Vermont, mwironen@uvm.edu
Sarah Coleman, Gund Institute for Ecological Economics, University of Vermont, scoleman@uvm.edu
Joshua Farley, Gund Institute for Ecological Economics, University of Vermont, jfarley@uvm.edu
Anna Kusmer, McGill University, anna.kusmer@mail.mcgill.ca
Caitlin Morgan, Food Systems Graduate Program, University of Vermont Caitlin.b.morgan@uvm.edu

 

Sunday, January 3, 10:15 am, Marriott Marquis, Pacific B
Great Thinkers on Ethics, Economics, and Financial Markets (A13, D63)

Presiding: Jonathan Wight, University of Richmond, jwight@richmond.edu

Aristotle on the Human Consequences of Financial Abstraction
Andrew M. Yuengert, Pepperdine University, andrew.yuengert@pepperdine.edu

Kant on Modern Finance: Are We Treating People Simply as Means?
Mark D. White, College of Staten Island/CUNY, profmdwhite@hotmail.com

Faction and the Warping of Moral Imagination: When Trade becomes a Zero Sum
Sandra J. Peart, University of Richmond, speart@richmond.edu 
David M. Levy, George Mason University, davidmlevy@gmail.com 

Financialisation and Economic Democracy
Andrew Cumbers, University of Glasgow, Andrew.Cumbers@glasgow.ac.uk 
Robert McMaster, University of Glasgow, robert.mcmaster@glasgow.ac.uk 

Comparing Adam Smith to J.M. Keynes on Financial Markets
Jonathan B. Wight, University of Richmond, jwight@richmond.edu

 

Sunday, January 3, 2:30 pm, Marriott Marquis, Pacific B
Financialisation and Inequality (E44, D63)

Presiding: Philip Arestis, University of Cambridge, pa267@cam.ac.uk

Direct Evidence on the Financial Sources of Rising and Falling Inequality
James K. Galbraith, University of Texas at Austin, galbraith@mail.utexas.edu

Financial Deepening and Economic Inequality
Salvatore Morelli, Center for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, salvatore.morelli@gmail.com

Rising Inequality, Household Finance, and Prospects for the US Economy
Barry Z. Cynamon, Federal Reserve Bank of Saint Louis, barry.cynamon@gmail.com 
Steven M. Fazzari, Washington University, St. Louis, fazz@wustl.edu

The Financial Sector, Economic Growth and the Inequality of Income Nexus: A Critical Assessment
John S.L. McCombie, University of Cambridge jslm2@cam.ac.uk 
Marta Spreafico, Catholic University of Milan, Marta.Spreafico@unicatt.it

Inequality and Indebtedness: Domestic and International Considerations
Michael Kumhof, Bank of England, Michael.Kumhof@bankofengland.co.uk 
Claire Lebarz, Paris School of Economics, claire.lebarz@gmail.com 
Romain Ranciere, Paris School of Economics and International Monetary Fund, romainranciere@gmail.com 
Alexander W. Richter, Auburn University, arichter@auburn.edu 
Nathaniel A. Throckmorton, Indiana University, nathrock@indiana.edu 

 

Sunday, January 3, 4:45 pm, Marriott Marquis, Pacific B (tbc)               

ASE General Membership Meeting

 

Monday, January 4, 7:45 am - 10:00 am, Marriott Marquis, Foothill G

Presidential Breakfast (Fee Event)
Presidential Address by Ellen Mutari:
Social Practices and Economic Life

Giuseppe Fontana, Presiding
Univ. of Leeds, UK and Univ. of Sannio, Italy

 

Monday, January 4, 10:15 am, Marriott Marquis, Pacific B
Association for Social Economics (ASE) – Association for Evolutionary Economics (AFEE)
Financialisation and Institutional Changes (B52, G34)

Presiding:Tonia Warnecke, Rollins College, twarnecke@rollins.edu

Shareholder Value Orientation, the Acquisition of Financial Assets, and Corporate Cash Holdings among US Corporations, 1971-2013
Leila Davis, Middlebury College, ldavis@middlebury.edu

Financial Liberalization as a Process of Flawed Institutional Change: Institutional Cognitive Dissonance and Systemic
Faruk ÜLGEN, University Grenoble Alpes, Ulgen.Faruk@upmf-grenoble.fr

Governance Structures, Cultural Distance, and Socialization Dynamics: Further Challenges for the Modern Corporation
Christian Cordes, University of Bremen, c.cordes@uni-bremen.de
Sarianna M. Lundan , University of Bremen, s.lundan@uni-bremen.de 
Stephan Mueller, University of Goettingen, stephan.mueller@wiwi.uni-goettingen.de 
Georg Schwesinger, University of Bremen, schwesinger@uni-bremen.de 

Unpacking and Reorienting the Ethical Subcultures of Megabanks and Their Regulators
Edward J. Kane, Boston College, edward.kane@bc.edu

Are Social Banks Really Different? Evidence from Europe
Simon Cornée, University de Rennes 1, simon.cornee@univ-rennes1.fr 
Panu Kalmi, University of Vaasa, panu.kalmi@uva.fi 
Ariane Szafarz, Université Libre de Bruxelles, aszafarz@ulb.ac.be 

 

Monday, January 4, 12:30 am, Marriott Marquis, Pacific B
Institutions, Markets, and Ethics (G01, D63)

Presiding:Malcolm Sawyer, University of Leeds, M.C.Sawyer@lubs.leeds.ac.uk

The Nature of Institutions: A Computational Perspective
Wolfram Elsner, University of Bremen, welsner@uni-bremen.de 
Claudius Gräbner, University of Bremen, graebnerc@uni-bremen.de

Restoring the Ethical Basis of the Opportunity Society in the Post-Subprime Era: Community Provisioning, the Logic of Reinvestment, and the Circular Economy
Gary Dymski, University of Leeds, G.Dymski@leeds.ac.uk 
(with Melody Chiong, Jesus Hernandez, and Lisa Mohanty)

The Size and Effects of Underwater and Barely-Above-Water Mortgages
Robert H Scott III, Monmouth University, rscott@monmouth.edu 
Steven Pressman, Monmouth University, pressman@monmouth.edu

The Case for “Economy Harm Profile” Analysis
George DeMartino, University of Denver, george.demartino@du.edu 

 

Monday, January 4, 2:30 pm, Marriott Marquis, Pacific B
Financialisation, Policy and Spatial Inequalities (E44, N20)

Presiding:Ilene Grabel, University of Denver, Ilene.Grabel@du.edu

De-Financialising the Financial System
Malcolm Sawyer, University of Leeds, M.C.Sawyer@lubs.leeds.ac.uk

Varieties of Capitalism, Increasing Income Inequality, and the Sustainability of Long Run Growth
Mark Setterfield, New school for Social Research, mark.setterfield@newschool.edu 
Yun Kim, University of Massachusetts, Yun.Kim@umb.edu

Monetary Policy in a Financialised World: Evidence from European Regions
Philip Arestis, University of Cambridge, and University of the Basque Country, pa267@cam.ac.uk
Giuseppe Fontana, University of Leeds, and University of Sannio, G.Fontana@lubs.leeds.ac.uk
Peter Phelps, University of Leeds, P.Phelps@leeds.ac.uk

Uncovering Ethical Earnings in the Financialisation Era: A Comparative Study between the UK and US Labour Force
Aurelie Charles, University of Bath, A.Charles@bath.ac.uk
Sunčica Vujić, University of Antwerp, suncica.vujic@uantwerpen.be

Financialization, Fiscal Policies and Differential Interest Rates in Core and Periphery Countries of Eurozone: A Monetary Theory of Production Approach
Andrea Pacella, University of Catania, apacella@lex.unict.it 
Riccardo Realfonzo, University of Sannio, realfonzo@unisannio.it 

 

Tuesday, January 5, 10:15 am, Marriott Marquis, Pacific B
Association for Social Economics (ASE) – International Association for Feminist Economics (IAFFE)
Financialisation and Gender (J16, G01)

Presiding:Alicia Girón, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), alicia@unam.mx

Even-after’ Access? Gender Matters in Financialisation in Ghana and South Africa
Shoba Arun, Manchester Metropolitan University, s.arun@mmu.ac.uk 
Samuel Annim, University of Cape Coast, and University of Central Lancashire, skannim@gmail.com 
Thankom Arun, University of Central Lancashire, and University of Stellenbosch, tgarun@uclan.ac.uk 

Seven Ways to Knit Your Portfolio: Is Investor Communication Neutral?
Henriëtte Prast, Tilburg University, H.m.prast@uvt.nl 
(with Cecilia Boggio, Elsa Fornero and Jose Sanders)  

Child Marriage as a Financial and Economic Transaction
Quentin Wodon, World Bank, qwodon@worldbank.org

Family Labor Supply and the Timing of Cash Transfers: Evidence from the Earned Income Tax Credit
Tzu-Ting Yang, University of British Columbia, nestofdata@gmail.com

Women as Social Economic Innovators after the Crisis
Zohreh Emami, Alverno College, Emami@alverno.edu 

Economics of the Unschooled Child Worker: Parental Motivation and Human Development Consequences for the Girl Child
Sanjukta Chaudhuri, University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire, chaudhs@uwec.edu

08/18/2015

Pictures from the 15th World Congress of Social Economics and Summer School

15wcJust a quick note to let you know that pictures from the 15th World Congress of Social Economics at Brock University in St. Catharines, Ontario, in June, as well as the Summer School that preceded it, are up at the Association for Social Economics website. Check them out, and be sure to join us for the next one!