4 posts categorized "Book series"

11/04/2015

New book: Storr, Haeffele-Balch, and Grube, Community Revival in the Wake of Disaster

Storr et al bookJust published in the Perspectives from Social Economics series from Palgrave Macmillan is a book by Virgil Henry Storr, Stefanie Haeffele-Balch, and Laura E. Grube titled Community Revival in the Wake of Disaster: Lessons in Local Entrepreneurship.

UPDATE: There is a dedicated website for the book here, which includes a short video trailer.

From the publisher's description:

Rebounding after disasters like tsunamis, hurricanes, earthquakes, and floods can be daunting. Communities must have residents who can not only gain access to the resources that they need to rebuild but who can also overcome the collective action problem that characterizes post-disaster relief efforts. Community Revival in the Wake of Disaster argues that entrepreneurs, conceived broadly as individuals who recognize and act on opportunities to promote social change, fill this critical role. Using examples of recovery efforts following Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, Louisiana, and Hurricane Sandy on the Rockaway Peninsula in New York, the authors demonstrate how entrepreneurs promote community recovery by providing necessary goods and services, restoring and replacing disrupted social networks, and signaling that community rebound is likely and, in fact, underway. They argue that creating space for entrepreneurs to act after disasters is essential for promoting recovery and fostering resilient communities.

Storr is Senior Research Fellow and Director of Graduate Student Programs at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, USA, and Research Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at George Mason University. Haeffele-Balch is Associate Director of Graduate Student Programs at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, USA, and is also a PhD Student in the Economics Department at George Mason University. Grube is Mercatus Dissertation Fellow and PhD candidate in Economics at George Mason University, USA, and Visiting Instructor in the Economics Department at Beloit College, USA.

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If you have any ideas for a book in the Perspectives from Social Economics series, you can email the series editor (and past ASE president) Mark D. White at profmdwhite@hotmail.com.

11/02/2015

New book: Quentin Wodon, The Economics of Faith-Based Service Delivery

Wodon bookJust published in the Perspectives from Social Economics series from Palgrave Macmillan is a book by Association for Social Economics vice-president Quentin Wodon titled The Economics of Faith-Based Service Delivery: Education and Health in Sub-Saharan Africa.

From the publisher's description:

The Economics of Faith-Based Service Delivery provides the first ever comprehensive empirical assessment of the role that faith-inspired institutions (FIIs) play in the supply of health care and education services in sub-Saharan Africa. Wodon focuses on estimating the market share, reach to the poor, and cost for households that rely on FIIs as opposed to public and private secular providers of education and health care services. He also analyzes the causes of user reliance on FIIs, the comparative performance of FIIs, and the level of satisfaction among those that use their services. The Economics of Faith-Based Service Delivery is an innovate combination of previously untapped nationally representative household surveys, qualitative fieldwork, and insights from the fields of religious studies and social economics.

Wodon is an Adviser and Coordinator in the Education Global Practice at the World Bank. See his blog posts at the World Bank and his own blog Rotarian Economist, which "features stories about service projects and provides analysis and tools for work on often complex issues related to poverty reduction and development."

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If you have any ideas for a book in the Perspectives from Social Economics series, you can email the series editor (and past ASE president) Mark D. White at profmdwhite@hotmail.com.

02/21/2012

Call for abstracts: Edited volume on law and social economics

Call for abstracts for edited volume

Law and Social Economics

To be edited by Mark D. White, College of Staten Island/CUNY

Planned for inclusion in the “Perspectives from Social Economics” series from Palgrave Macmillan

By its very nature, law is a social enterprise concerned with values such as justice, dignity, equality, and efficiency, but the economic approach to law (or law and economics) focuses on the last goal to the exclusion of the rest. Social economics emphasizes the importance of ethical values to economic theory, practice, and policy, but it has engaged very little with legal studies (or law and economics).

In 1993, Steven Medema published his article “Is There Life Beyond Efficiency? Elements of a Social Law and Economics” in the Review of Social Economy, in which he laid out various ways in which social economics could contribute to the economic analysis of law. In the twenty years since his article appeared, however, few have picked his baton, much less run with it.

This book is an attempt to rectify this situation. Proposals for chapters are welcome on any aspect of law-and-economics on which social economics can make a contribution, and are welcome from economists, legal scholars, and scholars from related disciplines.

Possible topics include:

  • Social-economic approaches to the various categories of legal studies, such as
    • Private law (tort, contract, property)
    • Criminal law
    • Procedure
    • Jurisprudence
  • Methodological critiques of mainstream economic approaches to the law, such as
    • Maximizing conception of individual choice
    • Efficiency criterion for evaluating laws and institutions
    • Application of game theory, behavioral economics, or experimental economics to legal issues
  • Examination of the history of law-and-economics scholarship
  • Suggestion of topics neglected by mainstream law-and-economics

Proposals should include name and affiliations of all authors, tentative chapter title, and abstract, and should be sent to Mark D. White at profmdwhite@hotmail.com by April 30, 2012. Tentatively, first drafts of chapters will be expected by November 30, 2012, with final drafts due by February 28, 2013.

12/08/2011

Two book series in social economics

There are currently two book series in social economics, both publishing fascinating new work and actively soliciting new ideas--new releases will be highlighted here when they are released. Please visit the websites below and contact the editors if you're interested in contributing.

Routledge Advances in Social Economics (Routledge/Taylor & Francis)

This series presents new advances and developments in social economics thinking on a variety of subjects that concern the link between social values and economics. Need, justice and equity, gender, cooperation, work, poverty, the environment, class, institutions, public policy, and methodology are some of the most important themes. Among the orientations of the authors are social economist, institutionalist, humanist, solidarist, cooperativist, radical and Marxist, feminist, post-Keynesian, behaviorist, and environmentalist. The series offers new contributions from today’s most foremost thinkers on the social character of the economy.

Series editor: John B. Davis, Marquette University (john.davis@mu.edu)

Perspectives from Social Economics (Palgrave Macmillan)

The Perspectives from Social Economics series incorporates an explicit ethical component into contemporary economic discussion of important policy and social issues, drawing on the approaches used by social economists around the world. It also allows social economists to develop their own frameworks and paradigms by exploring the philosophy and methodology of social economics in relation to orthodox and other heterodox approaches to economics. By furthering these goals, this series will expose a wider readership to the scholarship produced by social economists, and thereby promote the more inclusive viewpoints, especially as they concern ethical analyses of economic issues and methods.

Series editor: Mark D. White, College of Staten Island/CUNY (profmdwhite@hotmail.com)