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4 posts from December 2015

12/22/2015

Call for papers: IIPPE panel on "Social Capital in Context: Crisis, Values and Power"

IIPPE’s Seventh International Conference in Political Economy
“Political Economy: International Trends and National Differences”
School of Economics & Management, University of Lisbon, Portugal
September 7-9, 2016
 
Call for Papers – Panel organised by Social Capital Working Group
 
Social Capital in Context: Crisis, Values and Power
 
 
Asimina Christoforou, Athens University of Economics and Business
Luca Andriani, Birkbeck, University of London
 
Economic models of social capital incorporate cooperative behaviour and trusting relations based on social norms and networks, challenging traditional assumptions of self-interest. Yet these models maintain instrumental, value-free, and individualist principles of rational choice, reducing cooperation, trust and solidarity to a means for satisfying individual preference and ensuring market efficiency. Thus they overlook the influence of the broader social and institutional context within which individuals and groups interact and which is characterized by diverse and conflictual interests, power and inequality, social and political struggles.
 
In this way, we fail to see that not all norms and networks are socially beneficial. For instance the current crises have fostered increasing poverty and inequality, the rise of extremist groups, the flux of immigrants and refugees, and the spread of uncertainty, fear and violence. There are groups in the private and public spheres that still promote policies that lead to market liberalization, welfare state retrenchment, the indebtedness of households and nations, the over-exploitation of the earth’s natural resources, and the degradation of certain ethnic and racial groups. At the same time, there are groups that resist these forces, raise social awareness and propose alternative values and networks for the restructuring of markets and states in order to protect the natural environment, human rights, justice and public welfare. These groups range from social movements spanning across countries to local organizations, especially in the social economy, mobilizing to respond to their community’s needs for subsistence and self-determination.
 
Thus we would like to invite contributions that re-contextualize conceptions and measures of social capital to incorporate the complex reality of social relations, as a dynamic space where people interact, define and pursue, individually and collectively, principles and objectives, means and ends for well-being. The aim is to uncover the dynamics of trust, cooperation and collective action to promote alternative principles and visions about the economy and society that favour public welfare. But we also encourage contributions that generally address the topic of social capital. We welcome works that derive from various social science disciplines and use different units of analysis (individual, regional, country or cross-country level), methodologies and techniques (theoretical, empirical, qualitative and quantitative).

Abstracts (500 words maximum) should be submitted to Asimina Christoforou (asimina.christoforou@gmail.com) and Luca Andriani (luca.andriani@bbk.ac.uk) by April 1, 2016.
 
Also to submit your abstract, please go to the following Electronic Proposal Form, and carefully follow the complete instructions there. All deadline dates are included on this Electronic Proposal Form.
 
For more general information about IIPPE, the working groups and the conference, please visit our website

12/21/2015

Call for papers: Special issue of Feminist Economics on "Sustainability, Ecology, and Care"

Caring, both in the practical sense of hands-on carework and in the emotional and ethical sense of “caring about,” has been a central focus of feminist economics. Feminist economists have reclaimed care as a subject of economic analysis, delving into its implications for economic methodology and advocating for appropriate support for carework activities directed toward the young, very old, and ill.  Feminist economists have at times also engaged with the pressing problem of environmental deterioration – exemplified by crises such as climate change, species extinction, and water scarcity – but the analysis is not as advanced. Ecological economics has at times incorporated questions of gender in its analyses, but here again the inquiry is limited.

Yet, while the fields of feminist and ecological economics have engaged in only limited ways to date, they have much in common. They strive to get recognition for essential services that are unaccounted for by markets (emotional work, nature’s life-support services), and they are developing alternatives to the exploitation of people and nature. We believe that a more thorough cross-fertilization between the fields of feminist economics and ecological economics could open new horizons. To bring more attention to this agenda, Feminist Economics invites submissions to a planned special issue on sustainability, ecology, and care.

The special issue is planned for print publication in January 2018 (with advance online publication in 2017). Feminist Economics especially welcomes contributions from the Global South and transition economies.

For more details, see here.

12/07/2015

New: Association for Social Economics YouTube channel!

Thanks to the efforts of ASE president Ellen Mutari, the Association for Social Economics now has a YouTube channel, where you can find presentations from the ASE program at the 2015 ASSA and the 2015 World Congress of Social Economics (with more videos to be uploaded as they become available).

For example, below is the opening plenary from the World Congress featuring Dr. Kari Polanyi Levitt.

12/03/2015

Call for submissions: 2016 Warren Samuels Prize (Deadline: December 18, 2015)

The Association for Social Economics, one of the founding member organizations of the Allied Social Science Associations, together with the Review of Social Economy, would like to invite submissions for the 2016 Warren Samuels Prize.

This prize is awarded to a paper, presented at the January ASSA meetings, that best exemplifies scholarly work that:

  • Is of high quality,
  • Is important to the project of social economics,
  • Has broad appeal across disciplines.

It is preferable, but not required, that the paper is presented at one of the ASSA sessions sponsored by the Association for Social Economics. Papers will not normally exceed 6,500 words (inclusive of references, notes), and should follow the style guidelines for the Review of Social Economy.

The winner of the prize will be announced during the ASE presidential breakfast, to which the winner is invited. The winning paper may, subject to peer review, be published in a subsequent issue of the Review of Social Economy. The winner of the Warren Samuels Prize receives a $500 stipend.

The selection committee consists of:

The immediate Past-President of the ASE;
A Co-editor of the Review of Social Economy (Chair);
A member of the Editorial Board, Review of Social Economy.

This prize is awarded to a paper, being presented at the January 2016 ASSA meetings, in sessions not restricted to sessions in the ASE program.

Please send your paper electronically, as a word or pdf attachment, to ASE past-president Mark D. White (profmdwhite@hotmail.com) by December 18, 2015.