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7 posts from November 2015

11/17/2015

Lin, "Institutional Fundraising: An Analysis of Taiwan's Religious Enterprises"

ForumIn Taiwan, one could observe that several prominent religious groups such as Tzu Chi (founded by Master Cheng Yen in 1966), Fo Guang Shan (founded by Master Hsing Yun in 1967), and Dharma Drum Mountain (founded by the late Master Sheng Yen in 1989) have been constantly growing. These religious groups have not only attracted regular donors but also wealthy people within society and have been very successful in raising funds. Above all, they have established for themselves a worldwide reputation and become multinational religious enterprises. To analyze the fundraising performance of the aforementioned religious groups, this paper introduces some new concepts of institutions and also suggests several propositions on fundraising, entrepreneurship, and institutions. This paper points out that Taiwan's religious enterprises are an outgrowth of powerful fundraising performance. Once the religious groups enter the stage of institutional change, the amount of funds collected becomes the dominant exogenous variable and religious entrepreneurship becomes endogenous. Over time, this dynamic process has further promoted entrepreneurship. Again, entrepreneurship becomes the dominant exogenous variable and the funds accumulate at an increasing rate. Eventually, the religious enterprises emerge.

Brian Chi-Ang Lin, "Institutional Fundraising: An Analysis of Taiwan's Religious Enterprises," Forum for Social Economics, 44/3 (2015), pp. 284-296.

11/16/2015

Helmy, "Smith on Ancient Egypt and the Arab Islamic World: A Tale of Two Statist Models"

ForumThis paper endeavors to portray Egypt, the Arab, and Islamic worlds in the eyes of Adam Smith as implied in his work An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations from the perspective of the extent and desirability of state intervention in the economy. In other words, the paper attempts to analyze why Smith's stance on ancient Egypt changed from an example of opulence to an eighteenth-century Egypt that—together with other Arab and Islamic countries—represents a model with many challengeable aspects, although the extent of the state action was remarkable in both models, the ancient and the contemporary. Our premise is that Smith did not defend or attack the models based on the extent of state intervention in the economy, but on whether its intervention was conducive to, first, raising the person's well-being and, second, promoting the morals of Smith's “commercial” society.

Heba E. Helmy, "Smith on Ancient Egypt and the Arab Islamic World: A Tale of Two Statist Models," Forum for Social Economics, 44/3 (2015), pp. 251-283.

11/13/2015

Obeng-Odoom, "Africa: On the Rise, but to Where?"

ForumUPDATE: This is an award-winning paper! See more here.

Africa's hitherto negative image is now being rapidly replaced by a new persona: ‘Africa on the rise’. Developed mainly from Africa's growth experience, this re-imaging of Africa has generated considerable interest even among Africanists concerned that the continent has often been the target of crisis jokes. Even more notably, the rebranding of Africa has gained traction in corridors of power and centres of finance. For this latter group, however, the narrative signals more than a cultural repackaging. It is about confirming that Africa is ripe and ready to host investment and to open up markets in areas where they did not exist or existed but were not capitalist in form. Either way, however, the ‘Africa on the rise’ narrative achieves a major political and economic goal. Neglecting ethical questions about sustainable jobs, inequality and ecological crisis, while extolling the virtues of capital accumulation, it extends a particular neoliberal ideology which favours people with market power, not the majority with precarious positions or their relationship with nature.

Franklin Obeng-Odoom, "Africa: On the Rise, but to Where?Forum for Social Economics, 44/3 (2015), pp. 234-250.

11/12/2015

Jennings, "Atoms, Bits, and Wits: A New Economics for the Twenty-First Century—Part I"

ForumThree elementary components of economics are atoms, bits, and wits. The economics of atoms is familiar to economists, in the production of physical outputs treated as substitutes in consumption. The relation of value to scarcity with atoms is that abundance reduces the worth of material goods. The realm of bits is less understood; the issues appear in network effects, where abundance augments the worth of intangibles. The economics of networks is social: conflicts of interest (substitution) are balanced with concerts of value (complementarity) in combination. But in information networks—the realm of bits—substitution cedes to complementarity and competition defers to cooperation as efficient.

Frederick Beach Jennings, Jr., "Atoms, Bits, and Wits: A New Economics for the Twenty-First Century—Part I," Forum for Social Economics, 44/3 (2015), pp. 213-233.

11/10/2015

Call for papers: ASE sessions at the Western Social Science Association Meetings

The 58th Annual WSSA conference will be held April 13-16, 2016, in Reno, NV, USA, at the Grand Sierra Resort. The Western Social Science Association invites proposals for both complete panels and individual papers. See below for more information regarding the conference.

The Association for Social Economics is in the process of developing a relationship with the Western Social Science Association and encourages proposals in all areas of social economics. 

 Section Theme: Social Economics

Please submit individual papers or complete panels concerning the study of the ethical and social causes and consequences of economic behavior, institutions, organizations, theory, and policy, and how these contribute to a sustainable, just, and efficient economy.  Of particular interest, are papers devoted to furthering the recent ASE dialogue regarding topics such as ethics, development, neoliberalism, social economic analyses of race, gender, class and ethnicity, social economic analysis of crises, inequality, the reform of economics, the origins of social economics, and linkages to other heterodox traditions.

ASE members will be registered for the "General Economics" section.

 
Deadline for proposals: November 24, 2015.

 
Please include the following information: (All information is to be submitted in Word format.)

Proposal Format: Paper         
Section & Name of Section Coordinator  (General Economics, ASE sessions, David Plante)
Title of the Paper    
Name and Affiliation  
Mailing Address, Telephone Number, E-mail   
Other Authors                  
Abstract (200 words; New Times Roman 12)

Proposal Format: Panel
Section & Name of Section Coordinator  (General Economics, ASE sessions, David Plante)
Title of the Panel
Title of Each Paper (3-4 papers)
Moderator (Affiliation, Mailing Address, Telephone Number, E-mail)
Presenters (Affiliation, Mailing Address, Telephone Number, E-mail)
Abstract for Each Paper (200 words; New Times Roman 12) 

Scholars willing to serve as moderators or discussants should indicate their interest to the appropriate section coordinator listed on the website.

All ASE submissions are to be sent to: David J. Plante (dplante@western.edu), Economics Department, Western State Colorado University

Current membership in ASE is required for presenting a paper.  Membership information can be found at www.socialeconomics.org. 

All presenters and moderators are required to register prior to March 1, 2016 at the WSSA web site http://wssa.asu.edu.

11/04/2015

New book: Storr, Haeffele-Balch, and Grube, Community Revival in the Wake of Disaster

Storr et al bookJust published in the Perspectives from Social Economics series from Palgrave Macmillan is a book by Virgil Henry Storr, Stefanie Haeffele-Balch, and Laura E. Grube titled Community Revival in the Wake of Disaster: Lessons in Local Entrepreneurship.

UPDATE: There is a dedicated website for the book here, which includes a short video trailer.

From the publisher's description:

Rebounding after disasters like tsunamis, hurricanes, earthquakes, and floods can be daunting. Communities must have residents who can not only gain access to the resources that they need to rebuild but who can also overcome the collective action problem that characterizes post-disaster relief efforts. Community Revival in the Wake of Disaster argues that entrepreneurs, conceived broadly as individuals who recognize and act on opportunities to promote social change, fill this critical role. Using examples of recovery efforts following Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, Louisiana, and Hurricane Sandy on the Rockaway Peninsula in New York, the authors demonstrate how entrepreneurs promote community recovery by providing necessary goods and services, restoring and replacing disrupted social networks, and signaling that community rebound is likely and, in fact, underway. They argue that creating space for entrepreneurs to act after disasters is essential for promoting recovery and fostering resilient communities.

Storr is Senior Research Fellow and Director of Graduate Student Programs at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, USA, and Research Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at George Mason University. Haeffele-Balch is Associate Director of Graduate Student Programs at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, USA, and is also a PhD Student in the Economics Department at George Mason University. Grube is Mercatus Dissertation Fellow and PhD candidate in Economics at George Mason University, USA, and Visiting Instructor in the Economics Department at Beloit College, USA.

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If you have any ideas for a book in the Perspectives from Social Economics series, you can email the series editor (and past ASE president) Mark D. White at profmdwhite@hotmail.com.

11/02/2015

New book: Quentin Wodon, The Economics of Faith-Based Service Delivery

Wodon bookJust published in the Perspectives from Social Economics series from Palgrave Macmillan is a book by Association for Social Economics vice-president Quentin Wodon titled The Economics of Faith-Based Service Delivery: Education and Health in Sub-Saharan Africa.

From the publisher's description:

The Economics of Faith-Based Service Delivery provides the first ever comprehensive empirical assessment of the role that faith-inspired institutions (FIIs) play in the supply of health care and education services in sub-Saharan Africa. Wodon focuses on estimating the market share, reach to the poor, and cost for households that rely on FIIs as opposed to public and private secular providers of education and health care services. He also analyzes the causes of user reliance on FIIs, the comparative performance of FIIs, and the level of satisfaction among those that use their services. The Economics of Faith-Based Service Delivery is an innovate combination of previously untapped nationally representative household surveys, qualitative fieldwork, and insights from the fields of religious studies and social economics.

Wodon is an Adviser and Coordinator in the Education Global Practice at the World Bank. See his blog posts at the World Bank and his own blog Rotarian Economist, which "features stories about service projects and provides analysis and tools for work on often complex issues related to poverty reduction and development."

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If you have any ideas for a book in the Perspectives from Social Economics series, you can email the series editor (and past ASE president) Mark D. White at profmdwhite@hotmail.com.