08/31/2015

Tenure track opening in Business & Society at York University (Toronto, Canada)

York

This position may be of interest to social economists. Deadline for applications is October 30, 2015.

Position Information
 
Position Rank: Full Time Tenure Stream - Assistant Professor
Discipline/Field: Business & Society
Home Faculty: Liberal Arts & Professional Studies
Home Department/Area/Division: Social Science
Affiliation/Union: YUFA
Position Start Date: July 1, 2016
 

Department of Social Science 

The Department of Social Science, Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies, York University invites applications from qualified candidates for a full-time tenure-stream Assistant Professor position in the area of Business & Society to commence July 1, 2016. Applicants must hold a PhD (or completion by July 1, 2016) in one of the social sciences, an interdisciplinary social scientific program or a related field (e.g., ethics, political philosophy, history, critical management studies). Applicants should have an ongoing program of interdisciplinary research which focuses critically on the conduct and regulation of business, economic affairs and their social implications. Demonstrated excellence or the promise of excellence in both teaching and in research and publication is expected in at least one of the following areas: social economy; law, governance & policy; ethics in economics & business; heterodox economics; sustainable business & alternative economic development; business, inequality & social exclusion. The ability to teach courses in more than one of the program streams would be a major asset. In addition, applicants should have the breadth and versatility to teach the core courses of the Business & Society undergraduate program (see: http://www.yorku.ca/laps/sosc/buso/). The successful candidate must be suitable for prompt appointment to the Faculty of Graduate Studies. 

The deadline for applications is October 30, 2015. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. All York University positions are subject to budgetary approval.

York University is an Affirmative Action (AA) employer and strongly values diversity, including gender and sexual diversity, within its community. The AA program, which applies to Aboriginal people, visible minorities, people with disabilities, and women, can be found at www.yorku.ca/acadjobs or by calling the AA office at 416-736-5713. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be given priority.

Candidates should submit a signed letter of application, a curriculum vitae, a statement of teaching and research interests, samples of scholarly writing, and a teaching dossier including institutional teaching evaluations (where available), and arrange for three signed confidential letters of reference to be sent directly to: Professor J.J. McMurtry, Chair, Department of Social Science, S754 Ross Building, York University, 4700 Keele St., Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M3J 1P3. 
Email: ela@yorku.ca - (Subject line: "Business & Society Position")

Position Rank: Full Time Tenure Stream - Assistant Professor
Discipline/Field: Business & Society
Home Faculty: Liberal Arts & Professional Studies
Home Department/Area/Division: Social Science
Affiliation/Union: YUFA
Position Start Date: July 1, 2016
 

Department of Social Science 

The Department of Social Science, Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies, York University invites applications from qualified candidates for a full-time tenure-stream Assistant Professor position in the area of Business & Society to commence July 1, 2016. Applicants must hold a PhD (or completion by July 1, 2016) in one of the social sciences, an interdisciplinary social scientific program or a related field (e.g., ethics, political philosophy, history, critical management studies). Applicants should have an ongoing program of interdisciplinary research which focuses critically on the conduct and regulation of business, economic affairs and their social implications. Demonstrated excellence or the promise of excellence in both teaching and in research and publication is expected in at least one of the following areas: social economy; law, governance & policy; ethics in economics & business; heterodox economics; sustainable business & alternative economic development; business, inequality & social exclusion. The ability to teach courses in more than one of the program streams would be a major asset. In addition, applicants should have the breadth and versatility to teach the core courses of the Business & Society undergraduate program (see: http://www.yorku.ca/laps/sosc/buso/). The successful candidate must be suitable for prompt appointment to the Faculty of Graduate Studies. 

The deadline for applications is October 30, 2015. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. All York University positions are subject to budgetary approval.

York University is an Affirmative Action (AA) employer and strongly values diversity, including gender and sexual diversity, within its community. The AA program, which applies to Aboriginal people, visible minorities, people with disabilities, and women, can be found at www.yorku.ca/acadjobs or by calling the AA office at 416-736-5713. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be given priority.

Candidates should submit a signed letter of application, a curriculum vitae, a statement of teaching and research interests, samples of scholarly writing, and a teaching dossier including institutional teaching evaluations (where available), and arrange for three signed confidential letters of reference to be sent directly to: Professor J.J. McMurtry, Chair, Department of Social Science, S754 Ross Building, York University, 4700 Keele St., Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M3J 1P3. 
Email: ela@yorku.ca - (Subject line: "Business & Society Position")

 

Posting End Date: October 30, 2015

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08/20/2015

New work on Piketty and inequality from Puaschunder and Pressman

Two intriguing new works on Piketty and inequality from social economists:

1. Julia Puaschunder (New School for Social Research) has a new paper at SSRN, "The Beauty of Ivy: When Inequality Meets Equality." The abstract follows:

Thomas Piketty’s (2014) Capital in the 21st Century revolutionized economic thoughts on inequality. Started by the 2008/09 World Financial Crisis and cumulated in the subsequent Occupy movement, attention to rising inequality regarding economic wage, opportunity and wealth led to advocacy for a more equal society. Innovatively, this article argues for a mixture of equality and inequality within a system holding value when access to opportunities to transfer implicit wealth is distributed merit-based. By the example of Ivy League educational institutions but also elaborating on social environments and interaction networks, a novel economic wealth transfer model is proposed. Within an economic system, dyads of unequal crystallized value based on heritage (e.g., royal families, legacy admits) and merit-based equality represented by offspring from families with underprivileged backgrounds, whose outperforming ambition, fluid intelligence and drive may lead to fruitful social interactions and beneficial wealth transfers, may create beneficial economic outcomes. On the societal level, within networks favorable environments may serve as transformation hubs if entered merit-based by underprivileged families. While presenting a preliminary idea of an economic model of value transfer between equality and inequality, the article outlines a blatant research gap on information about the direct transactions and interactions between equality and inequality representing agents within societal networks. The article concludes with giving hope in Piketty’s outlook of rising inequality by showing the economic merits of inequality when paying attention to merit-based distributed value transfer opportunities.

Pressman2. Steve Pressman (Monmouth University) has a book coming out this fall from Routledge entitled Understanding Piketty's Capital in the Twenty-First Century:

Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century reached the top of most best-seller lists last year shortly after it was released. Nonetheless, few people actually read the book. Yet reviewers have agreed that the book is important because it touches on one of the major problems facing the US economy, the UK economy and many developed nations: rising income and wealth inequality. It also provides an explanation of the problem and a policy solution: a global wealth tax.

This book is intended to do three things. First, it provides a summary of the argument of Piketty’s book, which many people have bought and few people have read. Second, it fills in some of the gaps in the book, by providing readers with the background that is needed to understand the volume and the argument. This background information discusses economic data sources, measures of inequality and why income inequality is such an important issue today. Finally, the work provides a defense of Piketty’s analysis and at times some criticism of his work.

Pressman explains why the problem of rising inequality is important, where Piketty’s data comes from, and the strengths and weaknesses of that data. It defends Piketty’s inequality, r>g, as the reason inequality has risen over the past several decades in many developed nations. Using Piketty’s own data, this book argues that rising inequality is not just a characteristic of capitalism, but results from different growth rates for income and wealth, which can occur under any type of economic system.

Understanding Piketty's Capital in the Twenty-First Century is the ideal introduction to one of the most important books of recent years for anyone interested in Piketty’s work and the inevitability of inequality.

08/18/2015

Pictures from the 15th World Congress of Social Economics and Summer School

15wcJust a quick note to let you know that pictures from the 15th World Congress of Social Economics at Brock University in St. Catharines, Ontario, in June, as well as the Summer School that preceded it, are up at the Association for Social Economics website. Check them out, and be sure to join us for the next one!

08/13/2015

Special issue of Forum for Social Economics on "The Neoliberal Project and Its Consequences"

ForumThe latest issue of Forum for Social Economics (44/2, 2015) has as its theme "The Neoliberal Project and Its Consequences." It starts with an introduction from the editor of the special issue (and deputy managing editor of the Forum), Paolo Ramazzotti, and contains the following papers (blogged over the last week):

Riccardo Fiorentini, "Neoliberal Policies, Income Distribution Inequality and the Financial Crisis," pp. 115-132.

Maria Lissowska, "Is Poverty and Inequality Actually Good for Growth?" pp. 133-158.

Alice N. Sindzingre, "Whatever Inconsistencies and Effects? Explaining the Resilience of the Policy Reforms Applied to Developing Countries," pp. 159-178.

Claus Thomasberger, "Europe at a Crossroads: Failed Ideas, Fictional Facts, and Fatal Consequences," pp. 179-200.

Damien Cahill, "Review Essay: Representations of Neoliberalism," pp. 201-210.

08/12/2015

Cahill, "Review Essay: Representations of Neoliberalism"

ForumIn this review essay, Damien Cahill discusses four recent books dealing with neoliberalism:

Never Let a Serious Crisis Go to Waste: How Neoliberalism Survived the Financial Meltdown, by Philip Mirowski (Verso, 2013)

The New Way Of The World: On Neoliberal Society, by Pierre Dardot and Christian Laval (Verso, 2013)

Masters of the Universe: Hayek, Friedman, and the Birth of Neoliberal Politics, by Daniel Stedman Jones (Princeton University Press, 2012)

The Great Persuasion: Reinventing Free Markets since the Depression, by Angus Burgin (Harvard University Press, 2012)

Damien Cahill, "Review Essay: Representations of Neoliberalism," Forum for Social Economics, 44/2 (2015), pp. 201-210.

08/11/2015

Thomasberger, "Europe at a Crossroads: Failed Ideas, Fictional Facts, and Fatal Consequences"

ForumThe crisis of the European Monetary Union has revealed the weakness and the fragility of the European integration process. The paper examines the institutional changes which are at the root of the instability. What are the driving forces behind the introduction of the euro? What role do theoretical considerations play in this process? What influence on European integration has been exerted by neoliberal beliefs and convictions? Relying on an approach that combines basic insights of Gunnar Myrdal with Karl Polanyi's idea of a “double movement,” it concentrates on the institutional transformation that is at the basis of the European integration process. The relationship between (misleading) ideas and facts is at the center of the study. It examines the influence of ideas and theoretical models on European integration, the Single Market Program, the Maastricht process, the increasing imbalances since the introduction of the euro, and the strategies applied during the recent crisis.

Claus Thomasberger, "Europe at a Crossroads: Failed Ideas, Fictional Facts, and Fatal Consequences," Forum for Social Economics, 44/2 (2015), pp. 179-200.

08/10/2015

Sindzingre, "Whatever Inconsistencies and Effects? Explaining the Resilience of the Policy Reforms Applied to Developing Countries"

ForumWhy is ‘neoliberalism’ still a predominant framework within economics and policy-making? This paper considers the mix of theoretical assumptions, causalities and policies known as the ‘Washington consensus’, focusing on developing countries. First, it analyses their main elements, resilience and effects (the ‘lost decades in spite of policy reform’). Second, it examines the reasons of this resilience and argues that a reason is their adaptive capacity via constant exchanges between facts and conceptual assumptions, because this mix is constituted of heterogeneous elements (from neoclassical theory, ad hoc models or empirics-based policy-making): inconsistency is a core feature and as such its correction is irrelevant. These ‘adaptive inconsistencies’ are consolidated by the simultaneous theoretical/policy dimension of the mix. Its cognitive resilience is reinforced by the irrefutability of causations and the cause/effect time lag (‘after current costs, there will be gains’, e.g. growth), and is not challenged by the social costs of policies.

Alice N. Sindzingre, "Whatever Inconsistencies and Effects? Explaining the Resilience of the Policy Reforms Applied to Developing Countries," Forum for Social Economics, 44/2 (2015), pp. 159-178.

08/07/2015

Lissowska, "Is Poverty and Inequality Actually Good for Growth?"

ForumThis paper aims to provide some evidence on the not necessarily positive impact of poverty and inequality on growth. It follows the line of argument that these features of society, while actually creating pressure for efficiency and enabling more savings, may impede sustainable growth. The recent financial crisis and the following period of austerity have made these arguments highly relevant. The findings of the empirical analysis of this paper are that inequality in the context of consumerism and easy credit may lead to over-borrowing and excessive consumption, which is ultimately detrimental to its sustainability. Poverty also causes deterioration in general trust, disabling smooth cooperation with lower transaction costs. Inequality existing in a given society deepens this effect.

Maria Lissowska, "Is Poverty and Inequality Actually Good for Growth?Forum for Social Economics, 44/2 (2015), pp. 133-158.

08/06/2015

Fiorentini, "Neoliberal Policies, Income Distribution Inequality and the Financial Crisis"

ForumIn the last 20 years, the within countries income and wealth inequality has continuously increased. This trend largely depends on the diffusion of neoliberal policies which, along with financial globalization, is among the causes of the recent international financial crisis. Neoliberal financial globalization (Washington Consensus) went along with reforms of labour and financial markets which caused income and wealth concentration to rise. All this contributed to the growth of debt bubbles in several countries and, after 1990, gave rise to a series of local financial crises that eventually ended in the global crisis of 2008. The austerity-based response of the EU governments to the crisis is another example of policies prescription based on neoliberal theories that cannot work. The example of Latin America countries, which in the 2000s abandoned the Washington Consensus view and have been able to reduce inequalities, shows us that alternatives to neoliberal policies are feasible.

Riccardo Fiorentini, "Neoliberal Policies, Income Distribution Inequality and the Financial Crisis," Forum for Social Economics, 44/2 (2015), pp. 115-132.

08/05/2015

Arora, "Gender Differences in Time-Poverty in Rural Mozambique"

ROSEBased on time-use data from a 2013 primary household survey, this study examines the nature and extent of time-poverty experienced by men and women in peasant households in Mozambique. The main findings indicate that while women's labor allocation to economic activities is comparable to that of men, household chores and care work are almost entirely women's responsibility. The heavy burden of responsibilities leave women significantly time-poorer compared to men. Women's time-poverty worsens when the burden of simultaneous care work is taken into account. In addition, due to multitasking, the work tends to be more taxing. The examination of determinants of time-poverty shows that common measures of individual economic power, such as assets and education, do not necessarily affect the time-poverty faced by women.

Diksha Arora, "Gender Differences in Time-Poverty in Rural Mozambique," Review of Social Economy, 73/2 (2015), pp. 196-221.   OPEN ACCESS